Abandonment Party 2: Epilogue (Second Draft)

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I like evil epilogues. Or “stingers” as I’ve heard them called. I wish more novels would use them; the only evil epilogue I can remember reading is at the end of The Stand by Stephen King.

They pop up in films and video games way more frequently: usually after the credits. It can be as simple as Skeletor’s head bursting out of the water stating “I’ll be back!” Or, in the case of the film The Wolverine, it can be a scene so powerful that it can overshadow the entire story that came before it.

Some people might argue that having a new threat emerge right at the end is in bad taste. I mean the heroes fought hard! Why ruin it? But I believe an evil epilogue compliments the “roller coaster” feeling of being rushed between high and low emotional states. The ending is usually the biggest “high” of the story so the epilogue is the perfect place for one last dive.

But I don’t want to do it just to gut-punch the reader; I want to present relevant story material as well. In the previous book I used the epilogue to set up the sequel by having the villain Pinada appear. It also served to settle the loose end of what happened to Mackaba after the crash. I don’t like to shock people for no reason. Every shock MUST have a purpose.

I hope you enjoy this final scene. Shoot–this is it, isn’t it? Draft two is over.

I’m not sure what I should do next. Should I start the final draft? Should I just go ahead and begin the third story? Let’s have a vote! Sound off in the comments, my thousands of fans! And if I get no votes I’ll just assume you want me to prioritize my completion of all the Disgaea games and Skyrim instead! Continue reading

Abandonment Party 2: Chapter 28 (Second Draft)

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I just realized something: This might be a good time to talk about story endings! Or rather, MY story endings! Sorry, Animal Farm.

But George Orwell knows I’ve been disappointed by endings before. I wanted to make an ending that’s engaging. But how? I was concerned about this when I wrote the ending for the first book. I mean, the climax is done; the best part is over, right? What’s left to do? Have everyone talk about what they’ve learned? End with a line of pure and utter wisdom?

Yeah, some of that happened. But that doesn’t mean I have to leave all the conflict out. Why not make the aftermath a struggle? So that’s what I did: I had Mean and Dark struggle with the idea of his hidden identity. It was intense; I think they even spilled a soda.

I thought the scene worked so well I actually planned for it this time. Amazing stuff, this “experience.” Now THIS ending has struggles everywhere: King blames Mean for what happened to Parlay; Tome is suspicious about Dark; Darrow has a bit of a rivalry with Tenny.

But every conflict is quickly resolved or smoothed over with humor. I can’t leave the reader with an ominous feeling.

Not yet, anyway.

Continue reading